THE EST MODELLING AND SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY

AT A GLANCE

  • Rapid and systematic derivation, investigation and optimization of distributed system and system-of-systems models
  • Highest performing, scalable, multi-core simulation engine in the world
  • Enabled the empirical research that first demonstrated that V2V DSRC communication, in its current form, is insufficient to guarantee the safety of vehicles in traffic.

INTEGRATED MODEL-BASED DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION
Integral to the design of the ESSE System Workbench for modelling and simulation of networked, real-time systems and systems-of-systems was that it be able to incorporate:

  • ANY MODEL - discrete or continuous and of various fidelities
  • ANY SIMULATOR - discrete or continuous
  • ANY TOOLSET - compilers, editors, debuggers, monitors, optimizers, analyzers

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EST's Modelling and Simulation Technology

At the core of EST’s technologies are (i) the capability to rapidly specify distributed systems, and (ii) a scalable, massively parallel, distributed simulation engine that can concurrently execute thousands of network connected models.

Modelling Distributed Systems

Distributed systems may be specified as abstract/mathematical models (e.g. differential equation expressions of control and plant) and/or operational models (e.g. discrete-event expressions of control units executing software) interconnected using EST’s timing accurate, high-performance models of abstract, wired and wireless networks. Such systems may be comprised of thousands of interconnected subsystem models, as well as, recursively comprised of interconnected system models – in which case they are named system-of-systems (SoS) models. EST’s DSE-SNF technology is used to create timing accurate, high performance network models - including CAN, FlexRay, Signals, and DSRC (IEEE 802.11p + IEEE 1609.4 MAC).

The abstract models are derived from, and are consistent with, the Requirements of systems known as Executable Specifications. They are simulatable and, typically, highly parameterized. System Architects not only derive the Executable Specifications but also elaborate them, ideally through the use of structural parameters, and create various equivalent forms that reflect partitionings made according to Function (control, plant), Composition (hierarchy, polyarchy (parallel)) and Communication (function, message).

Once structurally elaborated, each member of the set of equivalent (in function and timing) system models is comprised of hierarchically and/or polyarchically composed, parameterized models of communicating subsystems each comprised of networked controllers regulating distributed plant. Systematic elaboration, using parameter values, of each element of the set of equivalent systems generates a, typically, high dimensional space called an architectural space where the number of dimensions is the same as the number of unique parameters. This space is searchable and architectures (system models with all parameters bound to values) that satisfy – or optimally satisfy - objective functions can be found using algorithmic and/or empirical search techniques.

High simulation performance delivers the ability to simulate mobile systems and systems-of-systems

The EST simulation technology appears to rank as the highest performing, timing accuracy preserving and scalable system simulation technology in the world. It is up to 30,000 times faster than competitor technologies in simulating network-connected models of systems and systems-of-systems, and often faster than the counterpart physical systems.

The Modelling and Simulation Technology – at a glance:

  • Rapid and systematic derivation, investigation and optimization of distributed system and system-of-systems models
  • Highest performing, scalable, multi-core simulation engine in the world
  • Enabled the empirical research that first demonstrated that a single radio DSRC (mobile WiFi) communication cannot guarantee the receipt of location messages, transmitted from even close vehicles using vehicle-2-vehicle communiction, that provides sufficient time to vehicles/drivers to evade crashes in typical, light to moderate traffic.

The DSRC investigation used EST's Systems Engineering Workbench to model and simulate as many as 500 autonomous point-physics vehicle models that each contained EST 802.11p radio + 1609.4 MAC models. The vehicle models operated in traffic of various densities, in scenarios including multi-lane intersections, multi-lane highways, and parking lots.

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