THE EST un-V SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROCESS

AT A GLANCE

  • First fully capable model-based design process - includes Executable Specification, Architecture and Optimization
  • Concurrent verification cuts 70% of the verification effort required by the V proces
  • Promotes safety, quality, reliability and economy throughout the supply chain 
  • The modelling and simulation of mobile (agent-based) systems is fully supported

THE EST un-V SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROCESS

A TRAVERSAL

As the complexxity of large-scale, real-time systems increases the traditional development processes, such as the V-process, become increasingly ineffective and dangerous.

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un-V: EST's Systems Engineering Process

As the complexity of large-scale, real-time systems increases the traditional development processes, such as the V-process, become increasingly ineffective and dangerous.

In an age of virtual systems modeling, in which the entirety of physics is a set of models whose validity is being continually tested empirically, the application of modelling needs to be fully embraced by the engineering community in the building of systems from the simple to the complex.

Until modelling and simulation is embedded in every process and proliferated throughout supply chains, the potential of engineering processes to produce safe, reliable, environmentally friendly, and economical systems will remain unwarrantedly low. This is always true when the outcome desired is to engineer optimal systems. It is especially true in engineering mobile systems where it may only be possible to use modelled environments to test systems in circumstances where destruction and death is a likely consequence.

Recent research Hanawalt and Rouse 20091 indicates that the development process is one of the central factors in determining success or failure in the automotive industry. The V-model, which is the dominant development process used in the automotive industry, incurs high cost and high levels of inefficiency as errors, faults and failures – particularly related to integration - are found frequently during verification, which is the last phase of the process.

Modelling enables the future to be built into systems specification and design in terms of projected technological improvements, market and economic conditions, and rates of technology adoption, for example. No systematic planning process is complete, many would say valid, without the ability to measure and analyse the effects of future change on products and the specification, engineering, marketing and selling processes that make them successful.

EST’s un-V Systems Engineering Process uses pervasively model-based design and simulation (MBD) to fully support the engineering of well-specified, optimized and thoroughly verified mobile and stationary cyber-physical systems.

1 E.S. Hanawalt, Rouse, W.B (2010): Factors Underlying the Success or Failure of New Car Programs, Systems Engineering, Vol. 13, No. 4, Pp389-404, Wiley.

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